Исследования и публикации

Поиск публикаций
Ключевые слова
Тип
Все
Страна
Все
Тема
Все

15.02.2019

Central Asia energy-water development program : annual report 2016

World Bank Group

The Central Asia Energy and Water Development Program (CAEWDP) is a partnership between the World Bank, the European Commission, Switzerland (through SECO), the United Kingdom (through DFID), and the United States (through USAID) to address the challenges of cross-border system interlinkages and national and regional energy and water resources management. The objective of the CAEWDP seeks to strengthen the enabling environment to promote energy and water security at regional level and in the beneficiary countries. Structured along three themes: (1) energy development; (2) energy-water linkages; and (3) water productivity the program pursued three outcome areas since its inception in 2009: (a) investment preparation; (b) regional institutions; (c) diagnostics and analysis. CAEWDP supports the beneficiary countries in achieving their water and energy resourcesmanagement priorities through national and regional actions, addressing the existing challenges and identifying opportunities to generate benefits at the national level and through regional cooperation. These priorities are framed by the “3-I”s – information, institutions, and investments. CAEWDP promotes an enabling environment for water and energy security through generation of knowledge, strengthening of capacity and dialogue processes, and identification of investments. From inception, the program broadened its engagement progressively from diagnostic analyses and information to increasingly strengthening institutions and to catalyzing investments. DOWNLOAD

14.02.2019

Central Asia Energy Water Development Program : promoting pathways to energy and water security - impact report 2009-2017

World Bank Group

The Central Asia Energy and Water Development Program (CAEWDP) is a partnership between the World Bank, the European Commission, Switzerland (through SECO), the United Kingdom (through DFID), and the United States (through USAID) to address the challenges of cross-border system interlinkages and national and regional energy and water resources management. The objective of the CAEWDP seeks to strengthen the enabling environment to promote energy and water security at regional level and in the beneficiary countries. Structured along three themes: (1) energy development; (2) energy-water linkages; and (3) water productivity the program pursued three outcome areas since its inception in 2009: (a) investment preparation; (b) regional institutions; (c) diagnostics and analysis. CAEWDP supports the beneficiary countries in achieving their water and energy resources management priorities through national and regional actions, addressing the existing challenges and identifying opportunities to generate benefits at the national level and through regional cooperation. These priorities are framed by the “3-I”s – information, institutions, and investments. CAEWDP promotes an enabling environment for water and energy security through generation of knowledge, strengthening of capacity and dialogue processes, and identification of investments. From inception, the program broadened its engagement progressively from diagnostic analyses and information to increasingly strengthening institutions and to catalyzing investments. DOWNLOAD

14.02.2019

Investing strategically in higher education : aligning public funding with policy objectives

Weaver, Jason Allen; Traveller, Andrew Gary;

Linking higher education finance and policy, referred to as strategic financing, is increasing in popularity throughout Central Europe and the Baltic Countries. Strategic financing essentially implies that public funding mechanisms are informed by and aligned with specific higher education policy objectives. Governments are asking how the funding strategy can be more supportive of policy objectives. Can funding formulae, for instance, be modified strategically to help realize certain policy objectives? If a government is seeking to enroll more science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students, for example, could allocating a premium to higher education institutions (HEIs) per STEM student help achieve the policy objective? Like many countries around the work, Central European and Baltic countries are exploring how different financing modalities can provide additional leverage in steering their higher education sector towards specific policy objectives. In recent years, many Central European and Baltic countries are facing common economic, socio-political, and demographic factors. These common challenges can broadly be categorized into three main themes: challenging economic environment; increasing European integration; and declining demographic trends. First, the region still faces fiscal constraints as it emerges from the global economic slowdown. Such economic trends have placed downward pressure on public higher education budgets and increased the call for collaboration between higher education and the labor market. Second, national higher education policies across Central Europe and the Baltic countries are impacted by a broader European policy environment, including the European Higher Education Area. Supranational initiatives, such as the EU’s Education and Training 2020 Strategy, Horizon 2020, and its Modernization Agenda for Higher Education, as well as the intergovernmental Bologna Process strongly influence national higher education policies. Third, a declining population in Europe is shrinking the number of working- and student-age people. After decades of growth in the higher education sector, the number of new students participating in higher education is slowly declining DOWNLOAD

14.02.2019

The costs of irrigation inefficiency in Tajikistan

Burt, Charles M

The Aral Sea Basin consists of the drainage area of two major rivers, the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya. The rivers originate in the Tien Shan Mountains and the Pamirs, and run through Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. An estimated 116 km3 is diverted for irrigation, one of the key drivers of economic growth, employment, poverty reduction, and food security in the region. Despite emerging water stress, water continues to be used in a particularly wasteful manner. Irrigation efficiency in the region is estimated at about 30 percent (that is, only 30 percent of the water that is withdrawn from the rivers for a specific irrigated area actually reaches the roots of plants), and average annual abstraction for irrigation is well over 15,000 m3 per hectare. Improving irrigation efficiency has important regional implications because large amounts of water could be unlocked for more productive purposes by other sectors or in other locations in the basin. 5. But irrigation efficiency is also important from a national perspective. Pumping plays an important role in Central Asia’s irrigated agriculture and accounts for significant sunk and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. As a result of inefficient use of irrigation water, all Central Asian countries score high in global rankings that compare the water use per person and per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Central Asian countries are among the most water-intensive economies in the world. The study focuses on Tajikistan in recognition of the interest expressed by national authorities who have articulated concerns about the intensity of energy and water in Tajikistan’s economy. Like its Central Asian neighbors, Tajikistan is highly water- and energy-intensive. Ninety percent of water withdrawals in the country is allocated to irrigation, with 44 percent of the area that was originally equipped for irrigation being reliant on pumps. The irrigation sector accounts for a significant proportion of the total national electricity bill, and is also one of the largest consumers of power in the country. Irrigation efficiency and energy use in the sector are intricately interlinked, and inefficiencies in the use of one resource inevitably have an impact on the other. DOWNLOAD

14.02.2019

Migration, remittances and climate resilience in Tajikistan

Babakulieva J., Kayumov A., Mahmudullah N., Mustaeva N.

14.02.2019

Assessment of the capacity of the Kyrgyz Republic to implement the Central Asian sustainable development initiative.

Bortsova S., Pechenyuk O., Sapozhnikova L., Halmurzaeva G., Filkova T., Sultankulova A., Gavrilova E.